2018-10-08 Dingle Day 1-Clogher Strand Cliffs-030.jpg
2018-10-08 Dingle Day 1-Clogher Strand Cliffs-030.jpg

Dingle


DINGLE PENINSULA

 

 

 

 

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Dingle


DINGLE PENINSULA

 

 

 

 

 
 
BLACK ROCKS
10.2018
The Dingle Peninsula, on Ireland’s southwest Atlantic coast, is the most westerly point of Europe - if you exclude Iceland. The coastline is fringed with jagged black cliffs giving way to vast sandy beaches where the land meets the raging North Atlantic.

Inland are rolling green hills and mountains - the land subdivided with a criss-cross of dry stones walls & clues of farming high up the hill sides where the soil is least fertile.

Here is where potato’s were planted but never grew, resulting in the Great Potato Famine. Old deserted farmhouses are all that’s left in many areas as starvation and emigration reduced Ireland’s population by half.

The area is officially recognised as one of the last remnants of the Irish language and culture. Travelling around the peninsula feels like stepping back in time.

My visit coincided with gale force winds lashing the west coast of Ireland resulting in huge waves crashing onto the deadly black rocks making for dramatic coastal photography.

Exploring the area was easy with everything within a small radius of our hotel. Smerwick Harbour and Clogher Strand were regular spots but we also traveled further afield into the Macgillycuddy's Reeks mountain range and the Killarney National Park.