2016-01-12-Glencoe-055.jpg
2016-01-12-Glencoe-055.jpg

Glencoe


GLENCOE

 

 

 

 

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Glencoe


GLENCOE

 

 

 

 

 
 
WINTER MOUNTAINS
01.2016
I haven't done much winter photography, especially in the mountains, so it was with eager anticipation that I set off to Glencoe in early January to meet up with Phil Malpas, David Ward and eight other photographers for a four day workshop.

December had been a particularly wet and mild month, so the hopes for snow and ice were high. Glencoe obliged.

At night the temperature dropped, partially freezing the lochs and rivers, giving us cold and crisp mornings, conditions that lasted throughout the day as the temperature struggled to get above freezing. At night it snowed, covering even lower levels. The stage was set.

Glen Coe is an impressive 10 miles long U-shaped valley formed from super volcanoes that erupted over 400 million years ago that were further shaped by glaciers in the last ice age 10,000 years ago.

The compact nature of the area gives easy access to lots of stunning locations.

Our starting point was the instantly recognisable mountain Buachaille Etive Mòr - "The Great Herdsman of Etive" - and the somewhat clichéd view from the confluence of the River Etive and the River Coupall.

Glen Etive, to the south, provided plenty of opportunity to shoot details of the river and vistas both up and downstream as it snaked its way to Loch Etive. Snow covered boulders, frozen water and waterfalls provided ample foreground detail.

As the week progressed the vast wilderness of Rannoch Moor, towards the east of the Glen, started to freeze. The many small lochs dotted across the landscape formed patches of ice, the snow covered Black Mount that loomed behind reflecting in unfrozen water.

My expectations for the week were high and Glencoe and the workshop more than delivered.